The joint Russian-US commission is working to erect monuments for Soviet pilots who transported Catalina amphibious aircraft during World War II.

Despite the existing differences, Moscow and Washington are successfully cooperating in perpetuating the memory of the fallen soldiers as well as the search for information about prisoners of war and those missing in action, according to Chief of the Russian Defense Ministry’s Directorate for memorializing fallen soldiers Vladimir Popov.

Vladimir Popov told reporters that the work with the US Defense POW/MIA [prisoners of war and missing in action] Accounting Agency was “out of politics” and there were “no obstacles” for cooperation. He also added that “they [the US Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency] are doing everything possible and even impossible to promote these issues.”

The parties are working as part of the Joint Commission on POWs/MIAs on creating monuments for Soviet pilots, who transported Catalina amphibious aircraft during World War II, he pointed out. One such monument is expected to be constructed in Elizabeth City, North Carolina.

“By late December, a camp [park] will be built where the monument will be erected,” Popov specified.

The official noted that there were plans to create such a memorial in Norway as well.

Representatives of the Russian Defense Ministry arrived in the United States in order to discuss the coming 21st plenary session of the joint commission that will take place in Moscow on November 7-9.

“Useful consultations and an exchange of opinion were held ahead of our November meeting,” Popov said, adding that the agenda of the coming session had been formed.

US Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Principal Deputy Director Fern Sumpter Winbush pointed out that the work with the Russian delegates was a great honor for her despite all the differences in the bilateral relations.

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